Travel to some of the world's most beautiful destinations from the comfort of your own home.

Inside Chichén Itzá – 360 National Geographic

Posted by National Geographic, explore the ancient Mayan city of Chichén Itza, often called one of the “seven wonders” of the world. National Geographic Explorer and archaeologist Guillermo de Anda narrates this immersive video, explaining the significance of the site and his current work searching for a hidden cenote underneath the Temple of Kukulcan. Click the links for more info. 360-degree videos let you look around your environment, so pay attention to what’s sneaking up behind you. In a web browser you can simply click and drag the video around. On a mobile phone you can look around by moving your phone. In a VR visor, just turn your head. With the visor, sometimes it’s best if you have a swivel chair and a few feet of clearance in the real world. As always, if you start to feel dizzy or nauseous, take off the visor and take a break.

Tour Tokyo, Japan

Check out this awesome video touring Tokyo, Japan, posted by CreatorUp. This video will take you to some of the most iconic areas throughout the city. Starting and finishing at the Rainbow Bridge with the Odaiba Statue of Liberty, we will visit the Meiji Temple, Shibuya crossing and Okinawa.

In 360: Notre-Dame Cathedral Before the Fire – BBC News

From BBC News, check out: Notre-Dame cathedral in the months before the fire filmed in 360 degree video. Footage courtesy Forum des images / TV5Monde Original footage directed by Raphaël Beaugrand.

180° Kathmandu, City of Temples National Geographic

Explore some of Nepal’s most famous temples and holy sites, including Swayambhu, a hilltop where Buddhist stupas and Hindu temples coexist. Brought to you by National Geographic. 360-degree videos let you look around your environment, so pay attention to what’s sneaking up behind you. In a web browser you can simply click and drag the video around. On a mobile phone you can look around by moving your phone. In a VR visor, just turn your head. With the visor, sometimes it’s best if you have a swivel chair and a few feet of clearance in the real world. As always, if you start to feel dizzy or nauseous, take off the visor and take a break.